Poetry Behind The Scenes – DK through K: A Four-Part Series

People have questions and roses have answers

– 5th grade poet

Poetry at The Willows

Poetry Night arrives every winter at The Willows! It’s an exciting event embraced by the entire school community. Yet long before the poets take the stage in February, poems are popping throughout the school.

My name is Deb; I’m a writer and movement educator who is privileged to teach poetry at The Willows. As I work my way through every grade level in a five-lesson time frame, each student has a chance to imagine, feel, and remember—then paint those pictures in words.

My goal is to make poetry a playful, interactive, relevant experience. Come with me behind the scenes and peek into our creative process. 

DK Poets: Move, Play, Wonder

How to teach poetry in DK? Read to the children, play with them, ask them questions! Questions and games facilitate the flow of words and feelings.  

Here, a crawl tunnel makes expressing creative ideas an engaging experience! First, I ask a question. Then I encourage the children to crawl through the tunnel like an animal. They pop out to share their answers in the voice of that animal!

Crawling is a developmental movement that primes the brain for learning; we’re building learning readiness as we build our poems, a line at a time.

Here, our youngest students are learning to make word pictures by drawing their answers to fill-in-the-blank questions, like sometimes I feel____. 

Kindergarten Poets: Play with Words

Silliness rules in Kindergarten!  I encourage the children to have fun with language, so we first explore poetry through nursery rhymes and books they may already know. 

Then we build on the sounds they’re learning in class, and turn them into silly sentences full of alliteration, like:

Taco’s Tiger taught a pterodactyl to talk too much!

Kindergartners also create individual poems, where I ask them to imagine, remember and add details. As in DK, the children respond to questions after lots of movement and play.

In this example, our “ties that bind” school-wide theme served as inspiration for a poetic form:

When I’m in 3rd grade I will remember

my blue Super Wings plane named “Jerome”

my blue sequined dinosaur shirt

my blue cotton candy

and eating spaghetti at home with my mom and dad.

– Kindergarten poet

It’s a joy to witness the excitement, the honesty and the clarity that these five and six- year-olds bring to their poems. Poetry isn’t some abstract art. We make it concrete as we play with our words.

To learn more about what Deb does, feel free to check out her website at: www.debstudebaker.com

You can follower her on Twitter: @mindbodypoetry