Activities To Do With Your Children At Home

If you’re running out of ideas or struggling to keep your children engaged and happy, don’t worry! We have compiled a list of activities that you could do with your children. Have your children choose one to two activities to do per day!

Science

  • Bake something.
  • Play with a tub of flour/cornstarch and water.
  • Inventory the plants & wildlife (from bugs on up) in your yard.
  • Learn the parts of plants/flowers & how they function.
  • Conduct easy “kitchen chemistry” type science experiments that are easy to do, like making slime, baking soda and vinegar reaction, etc. HERE are some examples.

Art/Music/Movement

  • Dance Zumba or other dance-along videos on YouTube.
  • Have a shadow show in the reading tent.
  • Host an Olympics with a bunch of events competitions – funny ones, helpful ones like cleaning and really fun ones like minute to win in style.
  • Create an obstacle course.
  • Explore a National Park or a museum virtually. HERE are links.
  • Create music instruments with recyclable materials and form a band.
  • Make edible snack art.
  • Choreograph a dance together.

Literacy

  • Have each kid write a letter and/or emails to a different friend or family member each day.
  • Write a story cooperatively.
  • Write a short story & illustrate it.
  • Draw maps of places or items around the house and then make directions from one place to another to see if someone else could follow it. Add clues and words on your map. You can also hide an item and create a treasure map to find it!
  • Listen to a story read by a celebrity! HERE is the link. The SAG-AFTRA Foundation’s award-winning and Daytime Emmy-nominated children’s literacy website, Storyline Online, streams imaginatively produced videos featuring celebrated actors.
  • Go on a letter/word hunt around the house. Hide the letters/words for the kids.
  • Put on a play.
  • Make a time capsule using a mason jar.
  • Trace shapes/letters/words on child’s back with your finger.
  • Draw a picture of your bedroom and label all the things in it.
  • Watch Lunch Doodles With Mo Williams Author of Don’t let the Pigeon Drive the Bus and Knuffle Bunny. Each short episode features Willems in his studio, teaching kids how to draw characters, and talking about his personal artistic process.
  • Join the Los Angeles Public Library OverDrive collection. This collection includes ebooks, audiobooks, movies, and magazines.

Connection

  • Facetime grandparents and friends a lot.
  • Have your child pick a topic they’d like to learn about and spend 30 mins each day on that topic.
  • Make tents and reading caves. Include flashlights, tidy snacks, books, and pillows!
  • Practice a mindfulness activity. Here are some examples.
  • Create a gratitude or vision board.
  • Have your child interview you about when you were his/her age and how life was the same/different.

Maker

  • Code using Scratch or Scratch Jr. Free download HERE.
  • Try stop motion animation with playdough (Instructions HERE to make playdough at home).
  • Create your own board or card game!
  • Build with Legos.
  • Turn your Lego maze into a coding activity. HERE are instructions.
  • Do card making/scrapbooking projects.

Math

  • Bake with your child. Have him/her measure out the ingredients.
  • Use a deck of cards and play war. To make it harder, throw down two cards instead of one and have your child add/subtract/multiply the total.
  • Go through your kitchen cabinets or office drawers and group objects.
  • Play boardgames that involve counting.
  • Identify shapes in your home.
  • Make a map of each room. This helps with spatial language. Ask questions about where they’re located and how close together they are.
  • Take out a measuring tape and measure items around the house.
  • Make collections and draw them. Find 10 leaves/rocks and sort them by size.
  • Graph the people in your family by the color of their eyes, hair, favorite things to do, etc.
  • Look for shapes around the house.

Hope these activities will help!

Remember, it’s also very important that we allow our children to be “bored” and not always provide them with activities to keep them entertained. Constructive boredom allows children to become creative and self-sufficient.

For more resources and information, please go to https://www.thewillows.org/about-us/coronavirus-covid-19-update

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