Once a Willows Student, Now a Willows Teacher: From the Perspective of Kendall Gross, Kindergarten Teacher

Contrary to my answer in the ‘99 yearbook, a career as a “ballerina” was never the real goal. In actuality, I have always wanted to be a teacher when I grew up. The Willows has been my happy place since the day I arrived in 1998, and I feel honored and excited to show up to work—every day—in the very classroom where my love of learning began.

I consider myself academically driven, and I largely attribute my time and experiences at The Willows to that descriptor. Never before—and not since—have I been a part of a community where curiosity and exploration are at the forefront of experience every single day. The Willows practices as it preaches; we are allowed to make and learn from our mistakes, we can turn an assignment on its head to suit our needs and style, and we have ample opportunity to form authentic and reciprocal relationships with our co-learners (aka peers, teachers, specialists, etc.). These relationships were the lamp to my metaphorical moth, and the practices I relished as a student still inspire me to grow both as a faculty member and person.

As an alumna working at the school I once attended, I am often asked a lot of questions, which is great, because, thanks to The Willows and their inquiry-based education, I love questions. The question that comes up most frequently is this: How was it coming back to work at the place where you went to school? My short answer is usually: “Surreal!” The long answer has much more flavor…

Many of the faculty that taught me and formed my personhood, are still at The Willows today. So, coming back to the nearly unrecognizable campus in 2016 as their “co-worker” was quite an experience. It took a few months for me to accept that the conversations I had with them were no longer considered part of my year-end written evaluation. It took a few months longer to not feel out of place at faculty meetings–as if I had walked into the wrong room at the wrong time. By the end of my first year, I realized I wasn’t living some strange dream. I actually worked among my mentors at my favorite school doing what brings me great happiness and satisfaction, and I would get do it all over again the following year.

I believe a well-rounded education is the greatest gift a person can receive. The Willows offers that and so much more. It offers a safe space, a place to question and create, a home away from home. So thank you, thank you, to my teachers, who created, packaged, and put the bow on my gift. I hope to empower my own students and guide them toward a love of learning just as you did for me. That is my goal, and that is why I am a teacher at The Willows Community School. Although, I’m sure being a ballerina would have been cool too.

Current teachers that taught (and continue to teach) me:

Kindergarten – Andrea Passarella

First Grade – Jennifer Cunningham

Second Grade – Dakota Smith

Third Grade – Wendy Amster

Fourth Grade – Jill Offer

Fifth Grade – Bobby Hamm, Jane Lewine

Middle School – Stuart Knox, Steve Futterman, Kyle Smith-Laird, Doug Klier, Liz Ganem, Brian Tousey, John Lee, Ann Istrin

Specialists – Marc Weiss, Susannah Funnel, Kristie Toomath, Cathy Leverkus

One thought on “Once a Willows Student, Now a Willows Teacher: From the Perspective of Kendall Gross, Kindergarten Teacher

  1. Nana Krause

    Kendall I am so proud of you. When mom wanted to send you to the Willows school I was very apprehensive but now I know that that was a superlatives choice. I love your article. It is not only extremely intelligent And thoughtful but funny as well

    Like

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